Reviews

‘Christine Poulson’s wonderful sense of place brings Cambridge to life. Cassie overcomes the problems facing her with wit and guile aplenty and ensures the reader’s empathy from first word to last . . . an enthralling and engaging read that underlines Christine’s burgeoning reputation as a crime novelist to watch.’ [Stage Fright]

- SHOTS MAGAZINE

A Beach Read

cover-beekeeperI am not really one for the beach, but when one is on holiday en famille, it’s sometimes necessary and I prepare for an expedition. So: sun block, yes, beach towels, yes, beach umbrella, yes, book . . . ah, that’s not so easy.

I won’t be taking my e-reader as it’s too likely to get sand in it. Books do tend to get bashed about a bit on the beach, so I won’t be taking anything I mind about. I’ll keep my pristine new paperbacks for reading elsewhere. It’ll be one of the books from the Oxfam shop, then, but which one? It should be entertaining – that goes without saying – but not too demanding. I will be interrupted by requests that I assist with castle-building, or go paddling, or buy ice-creams, or, who knows, I might even be tempted to have a dip myself, so it needs to be something I won’t mind putting aside for a while.

On this particular day, the book that went into the bag was Laurie R. King’s The Beekeeper’s Apprentice, the first in her series featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes. I had dismissed it as something that wasn’t for me. Sherlock Holmes falling in love and getting married? No! But then I saw it in Oxfam, and thought, well, maybe . . . After all, I do like a good Sherlock Holmes pastiche.

And, of course, I loved it. The tone is exactly right, the plot threw up a breath-taking surprise, and towards the end, I minded very much putting it down. I’m looking forward to reading the sequels. And I won’t be waiting for them to turn up in the Oxfam shop.